Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures - mytinyfriends.com Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures - mytinyfriends.com

Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures


Getting a new cat entails a lot of responsibilities. You are responsible for its food, shelter, and a complete list of cat vaccinations. Vaccinations are particularly important as it protects their bodies from harmful diseases. A simple shot can make your cat immune to certain illnesses so that he can live a longer, happier, and healthier life.

When Should You Get Your Cat Vaccinated?

Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures
Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures

The advisable time to get vaccines for your cat is when they are only about six to eight weeks old. The cut off time for vaccination is when they are four months old. You should also go back to the vet a year after to get the shots boosted to reinforce their effectivity. Adult cats do not require as many vaccine shots as they have better immunity compared to younger ones. It is okay to bring back your cat every three years for shots if they are adults.

What Are The Shots Needed?

Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures
Cat Vaccinations: Facts And Figures

The most common shots protect your cat against rabies, feline distemper, and viral rhinotracheitis. If you have a cat that is an outdoor cat then he naturally needs more shots to secure him against whatever he might encounter outside. The extra shots may include chlamydia, leukemia, and Bordetella.

You should still get the aforementioned shots even if you have an indoor cat. They are not automatically protected from the various diseases and illnesses in the world just because they are staying inside. There is still a chance that they might accidentally escape and wander by themselves in the outside world. Your pet might encounter another cat who happens to be a carrier of a number of diseases and then infect your vulnerable cat. It is far better to be safe than sorry which is why you should get your cats vaccinated, even if they are docile or indoor cats.

Conclusion

You also shouldn’t forget to keep your cats updated on their shots. It is ideal to stick with your vet and just regularly come back for some of the shots. You should also make an effort to research the environment in your area. There might be specific illnesses that are only endemic to your area. In that case, make sure to get your pet vaccinated and protected. This is also a public service to the neighboring cats as you ensure that they won’t get infected by making your pet a carrier.

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